Book Review: A Mathematician Reads The Newspaper by John Allen Paulos

This has been my latest coffee table book that I dip into a few pages at a time. The premise is that maths is not well understood, but that it’s all around us. Paulos’ plan then is to educate us through a number of examples, which run to just a few pages each.

From the start, though, one is struck by a very heavy American bias. I think he tries to name drop by using examples of people he thinks his readers will know, but outside of the USA, names of the justices of the US supreme court are not commonly known pieces of trivia. That left this UK-based reader a little nonplussed, as it could have been made far more inclusive.

It’s a real shame, particularly as I read through the first part, which was on the subject of politics, its relentless US-centricism detracted from some otherwise very good prose. Paulos doesn’t really go into much mathematics here. His focus is more about rational thinking and how that can apply to things of a mathematical nature. So do not expect a particularly pedagogical text or worked examples. Numbers are fairly thin on the ground. As such, some who, like me, picked up the book expecting a book primarily about mathematics might be left wondering if the title wasn’t a little misleading.

In truth, it’s much more about general rationality than it is about maths. Given the expectations generated from the title, this inevitably left me rather disappointed. I know it was a follow up to an earlier book of his, entitled Innumeracy, which may have been closer to a better title for this work than the one it has.

The way the book is supposed to be structured is meant to roughly mirror a newspaper. So the front part of the book has more politics, the middle is more ‘lifestyle’ and there is a bit about sports (almost invariably US-based sports) towards the end. At times, the link to the typical newspaper seems rather tenuous, even if the general thrust of the argument is sound. Yet for a science writer, Paulos just seems to lack any great level of enthusiasm. Many of the best science writers (I think here of the likes of Feynman, Dawkins, Penrose and Sagan) have an attitude of “[isn’t this brilliant? Come, let me show you]” whereas Paulos is more towards the brow-beating end of the spectrum. There is little joy to be found, with an air of despondency at other people’s lack of nous.

The other fact that cannot be avoided is that, though it was only written in the mid 1990s, it hasn’t aged well. Any talk he has of computers or the possible threat the internet would be to the newspaper industry seem rather dated. That cannot be a criticism against the author, though, as one cannot expect him to be a prophet. Rather, it is a word of caution intended for any potential reader. Though I cannot say I would be in a great rush to recommend this book to anyone. The material covered here may be found in many a popular level book on mathematics and are dealt with in more detail and with a greater level of engagement than may be found here.

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One response to “Book Review: A Mathematician Reads The Newspaper by John Allen Paulos

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